Friday, September 27, 2013

Practice Makes Permanent

One of the mistakes we make as homeschool moms trying to find the right curriculum for our child is to switch math curriculum each year. This one has too many pictures, this one doesn't have enough pictures, this one has a bit too much review, this one not enough review, not enough problem solving, need manipulatives. When we switch math curriculum so often, we short-change our child because at some point they will miss learning a particular concept or not get enough review on a particular concept.  Practice makes permanent.

My daughter is learning her multiplication now in her homeschool math. Because she's a visual learner, it helps that her math curriculum is online.  The interactive activities and pictures help her to see how there is a shorter way to count groups of items.  Of course we can and do use math flashcards and math games, but I want her to understand the concept, not just teach her memorization. Sure, at some point we may just practice memorizing the times table, but I also want her to get a visual of how multiplication works. It will help her when she moves on to more complicated math.

It's also important to show them how to apply what they're learning in the real world. For example, when we're at the grocery store and they want to buy a bag of candy, ask them, if this is $1 and we have $5, how much change will we get back? If we're buying 9 apples and I've already placed 5 apples in a bag, how many more apples do I need to put in the bag?

What tips can you share that you've used with your child?

1 comment:

Kat said...

Math is our least favorite subject around here, and the subject that is met with the most resistance. :(

I can't really add tips, because we do struggle with it...but I agree that applying math concepts to real life is key. The best advice I was given a while back involved being in the kitchen. Since both of my boys LOVE to cook, we were told to take the recipes that they are working on and change them. Halve them, double them...even make them funky (like if this dish serves 4, how much should we make to serve 10 *without* leftovers). Most of the time, they don't even really process that I'm making them do a math lesson while they are cooking. :D

Katie