Sunday, May 10, 2009

Defending digital media for science study!

I read a little of Dan Meyer's blog about the nlos cannon challenge. He's an educator who writes a good blog. He had one post defending digital media as worthwhile and saying how inefficient it would be if the kids actually had to tinker.

Heresy, but I agree. I commented:

I'm working on a science curriculum K-8 which is ....digital. While I'll have lots of experiments that could be performed in the real world and there will be lots of explanations that will evoke real world prior knowledge, the program will not be a blend.
The program will be built so that the students "discover" knowledge and the scientific process through software, simulation, data, and video. No textbook, only supplementary experiments. More heretical than that, the curriculum will allow for teacher-led teaching. It will allow for online group discussion. But, at it's core, it'll be student-paced all digital learning.
Of course, much of the scientific establishment explains to me that this is a bad idea. It is suboptimal. It's WRONG.
I'm not much for explaining why but I think that I can make a curriculum that will do a great deal of good in teaching science and building enthusiasm for it, but since I come out of a decade of developing video games (I've gone platinum as a producer), I think I have a few insights into engaging kids in an interactive process of discovery.
So I enjoyed your post.
John
founder of SpellingCity.com, Time4Learning.com, Time4Writing.com(PS - don't get too excited. this is a self-funded activity. It'll take years!)

Did I mention that I'd probably launch it first as a homeschool curriculum?



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1 comment:

Ruralmama said...

Oh man, I love it.

Of course, I love Time 4 Learning too, so that could be why.

Excellent defense!